January 27, 2020. Day 27: Through the sea.

Exodus 14:16. Lift up your staff, and stretch out your hand over the sea and divide it, that the people of Israel may go through the sea on dry ground.

We can only imagine the terror the Hebrews must have felt standing on the banks of the Red Sea that day. They had just been rescued from their Egyptian slave masters by the mighty hand of God. They survived the Passover night. And they marched out of Egypt unopposed. But now here comes Pharaoh’s army in deadly pursuit. The enemy is behind them and the Sea is in front of them. The people cry out in misery, “Why did you bring us out here to die, Moses?” “Let us return to our slavery in Egypt.”

Moses’ response to them is not exactly what we might expect:

Exodus 14:13-14. 13 And Moses said to the people, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again. 14 The Lord will fight for you, and you have only to be silent.”

Stand still. Shut up. Watch God fight for you.

We may have expected a response closer to “grab a weapon and defend yourself.” Or, “run for your lives!”

But instead they are told to do what is completely counter-intuitive. Stand still and be quiet. Don’t try to fight, and don’t run away, and don’t give in. Trust me.

And then God tells them to do the unthinkable. The one thing that definitely won’t work. Go forward into the sea.

Exodus 14:15. Tell the people of Israel to go forward.

Moving forward into the sea was a far greater act of faith than you may realize. In ancient times the sea was not just a body of water, it was believed to be the source of all evil and chaos. They called it the abyss and equated it with hell. No one could control the sea. The sea is death. And that is exactly what God is asking them to walk through.

The Hebrews’ salvation had already come on Passover night. By the blood of the lamb they were saved from death. But then the Hebrews had to walk through the deadly waters of the Red Sea. Why? Not so that they would die, the substitute did that for them, but so that their slave masters might die. Just like with Noah’s ark, the sea wasn’t their destroyer that day, it was their salvation.

Lt. Dan: the sea is his salvation.

Jesus came to conquer the sea of death. He pictured this when he walked on the waters of the sea, or stilled the sea’s raging storm with a word. In his death and resurrection Jesus conquered the true sea of sin and death for us once and for all.

Christ offers us new life, but it is the cruciform life of putting to death sin in our hearts. Like the Hebrews, we have been saved by the blood of the lamb, but now we must pass through the sea. Not so that we can die – we already died with Christ – but so that our slave masters might die.

How does this happen? It begins by standing still and being silent and seeing the victory of the Lord our God on the cross. He has fought for us and won. Do you believe this?

If you do, then you can move forward into the sea. Into the chaos and evil of life, choosing to suffer so that in that suffering we might see the power of Christ’s love for us drown the enemies that would enslave us. Pride. Self-righteousness. Fear. Lust. Selfishness. Jealousy. Each exposed and overwhelmed through faith in Christ’s love that is greater than anything else.

“To live is Christ” is a life of walking in freedom through the sea but on the dry ground of Jesus Christ. Following him into the waters of his holiness that would save us by drowning all that would enslave us.

You

What sea of suffering are you walking through right now?

You in Christ

How does knowing that you are safe on the dry ground of Christ allow you to face your suffering as an opportunity to destroy what would enslave you?

Christ in you

How can you seek Christ’s holiness over comfort today in your trial?

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s